Age continues to affect assisted reproductive technology outcomes

January 19, 2006

In 2003, more than 48,000 babies were born in the United States as a result of assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This marks an increase from 45,751 babies in 2002.

In 2003, more than 48,000 babies were born in the United States as a result of assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This marks an increase from 45,751 babies in 2002. The report also provides more evidence that a woman's age is one of the most important factors in determining whether she will have a live birth by using her own eggs.

The report summarizes national trends and provides information on success rates for 399 fertility clinics around the country. Overall, 28% of ART procedures resulted in the birth of a baby for women who used their own fresh eggs.

"Women in their 20s and early 30s had relatively high rates of success for pregnancies, live births, and single live births," said Victoria Wright, of the CDC's Division of Reproductive Health. "But success rates declined steadily once a woman reached her mid-30s."

Women age 40 years or older were more likely to have a successful ART procedure if they use donor eggs. The average live birth rate for women who used ART with donor eggs is 50%, independent of age.