AUA exhibit traces history of contagions

May 17, 2008

Continuing a tradition of displays that are as fascinating as they are informative, the 2008 AUA history exhibit focuses on the history, spread, and continued fight against contagions. Titled "Plagues & Pestilence," the booth uses text, archive photos, and presentations to bring the topic to life.

Continuing a tradition of displays that are as fascinating as they are informative, the 2008 AUA history exhibit focuses onthe history, spread, and continued fight against contagions. Titled "Plagues & Pestilence," the booth uses text, archivephotos, and presentations to bring the topic to life.

Rainer M. Engel, MD, the curator of the exhibit, came up with the idea 3 years ago, and has been researching it eversince.

"I've been a physician since the '50s, and I have learned so much from preparing it," he said.

Calling the exhibit a booth is an understatement. It's shaped like a tall ship - complete with sails, a mast, and rats - as a nodto the most common way contagions were spread until modern times with the introduction of cars, trains, and planes. If youmiss it here in Orlando, you have one or possibly two more chances to see it. After the meeting, it will be re-assembled atthe William P. Didusch Center for Urologic History in Linthicum, MD, where it will be on display for 6 months. Also, Dr. Engelwas approached by the organizer of an infectious disease meeting being held next year in Toronto who asked if he would bewilling to allow the exhibit to be staged there.

The presentation schedule for the remainder of the meeting is:

  • Sunday, noon: Galloping Consumption
  • Monday, noon: Smallpox-Now Truly Small
  • Tuesday, noon: Bad Air and Other Noxious Stories
  • Tuesday, 2 p.m.: Deadly Shipmates.