Dr. Harel on hot topics in pediatric urology

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"I think probably the area getting the most attention nowadays is advances in robotic and minimally invasive surgery," says Miriam Harel, MD.

In this video, Miriam Harel, MD, discusses current key topics in pediatric urology. Harel is an assistant professor of urology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

Transcription:

What are some current key topics in pediatric urology?

I think probably the area getting the most attention nowadays is advances in robotic and minimally invasive surgery. That's really been a big push in recent years, to try to keep up with the advances that are happening in adult surgery. I think also, there's been a big focus on transitional care. A lot of conditions that we treat in pediatrics, these children get older, and they become adults. There's more of a need to really make sure that we have people well trained in taking care of these adults who started out with congenital abnormalities. One other area that I find particularly fascinating is a lot of work is being done to try to improve options for fertility preservation in boys. This has obviously been around for a long time in adults, and there is a particular challenge in children who might be undergoing chemotherapy or some treatments that will affect their eventual fertility. The particular challenge is that they are unfortunately being treated with these toxic agents at an age where they don't yet have mature sperm. It's much simpler in postpubertal patients where they can maybe just bank sperm for the future. But in younger children, that's not possible. There are many centers trying to advance the options in preserving prepubertal testicular tissue and then trying to work out ways to then use that tissue in the future. There's still a lot more work that needs to be done for us to know what to do with that tissue later, but I think it's very exciting to be able to at least offer those families some hope.

Dr. Harel on nocturnal enuresis

I find I keep remembering how important it is to tell these parents that it's not in their child's control. I think a lot of parents, without any ill will, think that there's a component of laziness or lack of motivation or lack of interest. But overnight, while these children are sleeping, it's completely out of their control. And it's important for both parents and child to know that.

This transcription was edited for clarity.

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