• Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
  • Hormone Therapy
  • Genomic Testing
  • Next-Generation Imaging
  • UTUC
  • OAB and Incontinence
  • Genitourinary Cancers
  • Kidney Cancer
  • Men's Health
  • Pediatrics
  • Female Urology
  • Sexual Dysfunction
  • Kidney Stones
  • Urologic Surgery
  • Bladder Cancer
  • Benign Conditions
  • Prostate Cancer

Legislation improves accessibility to mental health programs for clinicians

News
Article

Congress has taken actions aimed at protecting arrangements in which hospitals and other entities provide bona fide mental health improvement, behavioral health improvement, or maintenance programs to physicians and other clinicians.

This article first appeared on our sister site Medical Economics.

"Health care providers should regard these new protections as welcome news, given the documented mental health struggles of health care workers. The mental health concerns of individual providers undoubtedly can adversely affect the quality of care received by patients and the overall costs of health care delivery," writes Robert A. Wells.

"Health care providers should regard these new protections as welcome news, given the documented mental health struggles of health care workers. The mental health concerns of individual providers undoubtedly can adversely affect the quality of care received by patients and the overall costs of health care delivery," writes Robert A. Wells.

Several factors contribute to staffing shortages faced by hospitals and health care providers, not only negatively impacting the ability to provide adequate care for patients but also increasing strain on existing employees. Stressful work environments, fatigue, burnout, and aging patient populations who require more care all add to the hardship of attracting and maintaining clinical staff.

To tackle the ongoing staffing crisis and improve the mental health and wellness of individual practitioners, Congress has introduced changes in the 2023 Consolidated Appropriations Act to the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) and Physician Self-Referral Law (commonly known as the Stark Law).

The changes are intended to enhance the mental well-being of health care professionals by protecting arrangements in which hospitals and other entities provide bona fide mental health improvement, behavioral health improvement, or maintenance programs to physicians and other clinicians.

Without these statutory protections, health care entities would be subject to risks under the AKS and Stark Law, because provding such benefits to individual providers may not fit within an exception or safe harbor, and could constitute improper remuneration with referrals of federal health care programs to the entity providing the services. The new law requires that programs meet certain criteria to qualify for protection under AKS, Stark Law or both, including the following:

The program consists of counseling, mental health services, a suicide prevention program or a substance use disorder prevention and treatment program.

The program is made available to physicians or other clinicians for the primary purpose of preventing suicide, improving mental health and resiliency, or providing training in appropriate strategies to promote the mental health and resiliency of such physicians or other clinicians.

The program is set out in a written policy that is approved in advance of becoming operational by the governing body of the entity providing any such program and includes a description of the content and duration of the program, a description of the evidence-based support for the design of the program, the estimated cost of the program, the names of personnel implementing the program, and the method by which the entity will evaluate the use and success of the program.

The program, if offered by an entity with a formal medical staff, must be offered to all physicians and other clinicians who practice in the geographic area served by the entity.

The program is offered to all such physicians or other clinicians on the same terms and conditions and without regard to the volume or value of referrals or other business generated by a physician or clinician for the entity.

The program is evidence based and conducted by a qualified health professional.

Neither the provision of the program nor the value of the program is contingent upon the number or value of referrals made by a physician or clinician to the entity providing the program or the amount or value of other business generated by providers.

Health care providers should regard these new protections as welcome news, given the documented mental health struggles of health care workers. The mental health concerns of individual providers undoubtedly can adversely affect the quality of care received by patients and the overall costs of health care delivery.

The Association of American Medical Colleges predicts that the U.S. will face a shortage of up to 124,000 physicians by 2034. Menahwile, nursing staff workforce shortages are causing health care systems to limit access to care by staffing fewer beds while also incurring significant labor costs to recruit and retain staff (including increased use of costly contract agency labor).

Although congressional protection of mental wellness programs gives a degree of flexibility for health care entities to address these concerns, the industry will continue to need additional innovative solutions concerning workforce wellness.

Robert Wells is a shareholder in Baker Donelson’s Baltimore office who represents clients in health care regulatory and corporate matters. Michaela Poizner is chair of the Health Law Group and founder of the Behavioral Health Initiative.

Related Videos
Anne M. Suskind, MD, MS, FACS, FPMRS, answers a question during a Zoom video interview
African American doctor having headache while reading an e-mail on laptop | Image Credit: © Drazen - stock.adobe.com
Man talking with a doctor on a tablet | Image Credit: © JPC-PROD - stock.adobe.com
Anne M. Suskind, MD, MS, FACS, FPMRS, answers a question during a Zoom video interview
Related Content
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.