Study: Repeat curve assessments enhance efficacy of CCH injections

Commentary
Video

“As far as that point of max curve, I would say this is pretty definitive that this is something that needs to be done and changed within someone's practice,” says Landon Trost, MD.

In this video, Landon Trost, MD, highlights future research and key takeaways from the study, “Changes in point of maximal curvature during collagenase clostridium histolyticum injections for Peyronie’s disease,” for which he served as the senior author. Trost is the founder and director of the Male Fertility and Peyronie’s Clinic in Orem, Utah.

Video Transcript:

Is there any future research on this topic planned?

This has changed how we do treatment as far as it makes it so that we do a repeat curve assessment each time. I think it's always helpful to have more data from other institutions to see if they can validate and confirm the findings and see if that's the same thing that they're observing. But with this specific topic, I don't know if there's going to be too much more in depth, because it proves the concept that it does move, you do need to change practice based on it. Now, we're continuing to try to improve the technique in other ways, and there's certainly areas where researching in that regard. As far as that point of max curve, I would say this is pretty definitive that this is something that needs to be done and changed within someone's practice.

What is the overall take-home message based on these findings?

I would say if you're administering Xiaflex, then it's a change in protocol where you really should be doing a repeat curve assessment with each series. You don't necessarily have to do it from injection 1 to injection 2 within the same series. But let's say you're only getting your initial baseline curve assessment, and then that's it, then most likely, you're going to get a much less effective overall treatment than if you do that repeat curve assessment each time. Now it's tricky. I recognize the challenges to a practice because practice logistics are tough, and it takes time to be able to measure the curvature, then plus or minus, you have to bring the erection down, and things like that. It's certainly logistically challenging, but from an overall treatment efficacy standpoint, there's no question that it's the better way to go.

This transcription has been edited for clarity.

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