Urologists’ on call compensation: How it compares

May 13, 2013

Urologists’ compensation for on call coverage compares favorably with that of some other specialties and exceeds family physicians’ compensation, according to a survey that shows a wide variation in on call compensation by specialty.

Urologists’ compensation for on call coverage compares favorably with that of some other specialties and exceeds family physicians’ compensation, according to a survey that shows a wide variation in on call compensation by specialty.

Urologists reported median daily compensation of $500 for on call coverage, according to the Medical Group Management Association’s “Medical Directorship and On-Call Compensation Survey: 2013 Report Based on 2012 Data.” That amount puts urology on par with obstetrics/gynecology (also $500) and neurology ($600), but significantly lower than orthopedics ($953) and general surgery ($1,000). Primary care physicians reported a daily rate of $150.

The survey found a big range in median daily compensation, with a low of $75 and a high of $2,400.

More than 35% of physicians responding to the survey reported receiving on call compensation in the form of a daily stipend. More than 12% reported an annual stipend for on call coverage, and only 7% reported compensation in the form of an hourly stipend.

“The number of organizations paying for call in some form or another appears to be increasing as new physicians enter the work force,” said Jeffrey B. Milburn, MBA, of MGMA’s Health Care Consulting Group. “Call compensation may address multiple variables, and methodologies can range from being a fairly simple hourly rate or annual stipend to a more complex arrangement addressing time and additional subsidies for uninsured patients, retention of professional fees, and restricted or unrestricted call coverage.”

The survey report includes data on 3,950 providers in 295 groups. The full report is available online from the MGMA.

Related Content

Urologists make the shift to hospital, group practice

Payers, not states, often dictate non-physicians’ authority, reimbursement