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AUGS issues guide on sacrocolpopexy credentialing

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The American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS) has released new guidelines for privileging and credentialing physicians for sacrocolpopexy in an effort to assist health care institutions when considering granting privileges to perform the procedure for pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

The American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS) has released new guidelines for privileging and credentialing physicians for sacrocolpopexy in an effort to assist health care institutions when considering granting privileges to perform the procedure for pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

"Sacrocolpopexy for POP should be performed by surgeons with board certification or active candidacy for board certification in obstetrics and gynecology or urology who also have requisite knowledge, surgical skills, and experience in reconstructive pelvic surgery," AUGS President Anthony G. Visco, MD, said in a statement.

The document, published in Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery (2013; 19:62-5), provides guidelines for surgeons requesting new privileges to perform sacrocolpopexy as well as surgeons who currently have privileges and are requesting renewal.

The guideline, from the AUGS Guidelines Development Committee, includes the following key points:

  • Sacrocolpopexy should only be performed by surgeons with board certification or active candidacy for board certification in obstetrics and gynecology or urology who also have requisite knowledge, surgical skills, and experience in reconstructive pelvic surgery.

  • Outcomes and complications of sacrocolpopexy and other prolapse procedures should be monitored by annual internal audit or other mechanism at the local institution.

  • Informed consent should highlight: potential benefits and complications of sacrocolpopexy; alternatives including nonsurgical options (eg, pessary) and other surgical treatments; potential complications of mesh used in sacrocolpopexy including but not limited to mesh exposure/extrusion through vaginal epithelium or erosion into viscera, possibly requiring repeat surgery, and other known complications.

 

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