On-demand aerosol spray increases ejaculatory latency

January 28, 2010

An investigational treatment for premature ejaculation, PSD502, appears to delay ejaculation up to five times longer than placebo, according to a study presented at the 2009 Sexual Medicine Society of North America annual meeting in San Diego.

An investigational treatment for premature ejaculation, PSD502, appears to delay ejaculation up to five times longer than placebo, according to a study presented at the 2009 Sexual Medicine Society of North America annual meeting in San Diego.

"Premature ejaculation can have a powerful negative impact on the emotional and sexual lives of men and their partners," said co-author Stanley E. Althof, PhD, of the Center for Marital and Sexual Health of South Florida, West Palm Beach. "We need to work to develop treatments, and these encouraging results with PSD502 seem to be a step in the right direction."

A proprietary formulation of lidocaine and prilocaine dispensed by a metered-dose aerosol, PSD502 works selectively on non-keratinized skin on the glans penis.

The trial, the second of two studies, randomized 256 patients across 38 centers in the U.S., Canada, and Poland. Results showed that men who were treated with PSD502 5 minutes before intercourse were able to delay ejaculation up to five times longer than those who used placebo.

Final analyses of the 3-month data confirmed that PSD502 produced a clinically and statistically significant increase from baseline in all study primary and secondary endpoints, Dr. Althof and colleagues reported. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) for the PSD502 group increased 4.7-fold compared with 1.5-fold in placebo recipients (p

Patients and partners reported significant improvements in sexual satisfaction, and the drug was well tolerated, the researchers said.