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Dr. Basralian discusses the benefits of focal therapy in prostate cancer

Video

"Catheters go in, [and] they come out within 2 to 3 days for my patients. Therefore, the perioperative period is very easy for patients, whereas radical surgery requires catheters for 7 to 10 days," says Kevin R. Basralian, MD.

In this video, Kevin R. Basralian, MD, discusses the benefits of focal therapy for patients with prostate cancer. Basralian is a senior urologist at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey.

Video Transcript:

I've done plenty of cases, both freezing focal therapy and more now, HIFU. The benefit for most of these are in the right hands, complication rate is extremely low. Incontinence [is] extremely low, probably less than 3%. That is, a little leakage, not completely wetting yourself. Sexual dysfunction again depends upon the location of the gland. If it's near what they call the neurovascular bundles, which have the nerves and vascular supply to the erectile tissues, if you freeze that area, treat that area, yes, you will affect it. But if you're doing unilateral treatment, you don't affect the contralateral side, therefore, your [adverse] effects are less.

Catheter care: catheters go in, [and] they come out within 2 to 3 days for my patients. Therefore, the perioperative period is very easy for patients, whereas radical surgery requires catheters for 7 to 10 days, [in addition to] potential leaks and complication of urine, etc. You don't have that with focal therapy, so patients are extremely happy with therapy. No man likes to be catheterized longer than necessary. I think the patient satisfaction is fantastic. You can offer this to patients, without undue expectations; I think it's really important that we explain these things to patients. The more patients know before the procedure, the better they're going to do after the procedure. So, I think that the patient compliance is great. Again, my job is not to convince people to do one treatment or the other; my responsibility is to let patients know what is out there, what might be best suited to them based upon their age, expectations, tumor location, etc.

This transcription has been edited for clarity.

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