Dr. Schaeffer looks ahead on what to expect from PSMA-PET in prostate cancer

Opinion
Video

"PSMA-PET is a radio nucleotide-based imaging modality that really has changed the landscape of how we initially stage and subsequently follow individuals who have a diagnosis of prostate cancer," says Edward M. Schaeffer, MD, PhD.

In this video, Edward M. Schaeffer, MD, PhD, discusses what’s on the horizon for PSMA-PET in prostate cancer. Schaeffer is chair and Harold Binstein Professor of Urology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois.

Transcription:

What is on the horizon in terms of new products or the role of PSMA-PET in the prostate cancer paradigm?

PSMA-PET is a radio nucleotide-based imaging modality that really has changed the landscape of how we initially stage and subsequently follow individuals who have a diagnosis of prostate cancer. Additionally, there have been approvals for agents that are PSMA linked that have radio nucleotides on them that are therapeutic as well. So we've already made tremendous advances in terms of what tools we have, and the options and availability of those tools. Moving forward, I think there's going to be various augmentations of the basic principle of link to a prostate-specific molecule and then highlight it. That would be some of the basic PET agents, and/or link to a prostate cancer PSMA and also target it with a, for example, radioactive alpha- or beta-emitting agent. I think the next advances will be kind of multivalent molecules that will see and bind to PSMA-expressing cells plus potentially other agents or other markers on the cell surface, which will potentially enhance the sensitivity and potentially enhance the ability to identify smaller lesions, greater affinity for particular lesions, etc. So I think in terms of the future, I'm excited about the idea of the bivalent or multivalent PET-PSMA-linked molecules and then those bivalent or multivalent agents could be linked to other cell surface molecules, or other radioactive agents that could potentially help them the tumor kill.

This transcription was edited for clarity.

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