FDA issues final rule on manufacturing practices for dietary supplements

July 5, 2007

FDA has announced a final rule establishing regulations to require current good manufacturing practices for dietary supplements. The rule ensures that dietary supplements are produced in a quality manner, do not contain contaminants or impurities, and are accurately labeled.

FDA has announced a final rule establishing regulations to require current good manufacturing practices for dietary supplements. The rule ensures that dietary supplements are produced in a quality manner, do not contain contaminants or impurities, and are accurately labeled.

“This rule helps to ensure the quality of dietary supplements so that consumers can be confident that the products they purchase contain what is on the label," said FDA Commissioner Andrew C. von Eschenbach, MD. “In addition, as a result of recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, by the end of the year, industry will be required to report all serious dietary supplement-related adverse events to FDA.”

Under the final rule, manufacturers are required to evaluate the identity, purity, strength, and composition of their dietary supplements. If dietary supplements contain contaminants or do not contain the dietary ingredient they are represented to contain, FDA would consider those products to be adulterated or misbranded.

The aim of the final rule is to prevent inclusion of the wrong ingredients, too much or too little of a dietary ingredient, contamination by substances such as natural toxins, bacteria, pesticides, glass, lead and other heavy metals, as well as improper packaging and labeling.

As a companion document, FDA also is issuing an interim final rule that outlines a petition process for manufacturers to request an exemption to the current good manufacturing practices requirement for 100% identity testing of specific dietary ingredients used in the processing of dietary supplements. Under the interim final rule, the manufacturer may be exempted from the dietary ingredient identity testing requirement if it can provide sufficient documentation that the reduced frequency of testing requested would still ensure the identity of the dietary ingredient.