Novel test following RP could detect recurrence earlier

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A new test could reliably detect early increases in PSA levels in men who have undergone prostate cancer surgery.

A new test could reliably detect early increases in PSA levels in men who have undergone prostate cancer surgery.

Data measuring the efficacy of this new test, called AccuPSA, were presented at the American Association for Cancer Research International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development in Denver.

"AccuPSA is a simple blood test that can tell a physician important information about PSA levels after radical prostatectomy," said David Wilson, PhD, of Quanterix Corp., Cambridge, MA, the manufacturer of the test. "AccuPSA has the potential to eliminate unnecessary treatments and enable earlier detection of recurrence, which may lead to earlier treatment, better outcomes and have a positive impact on health care costs."

AccuPSA, which uses Quanterix’s proprietary Single Molecule Array technology, is able to detect PSA at much lower levels than standard PSA tests because it can selectively capture and measure individual PSA molecules, researchers say.

To determine the accuracy of the test, PSA levels were measured in blood taken from 60 men who had undergone radical prostatectomy. These specimens had all been categorized as being below the detection limit of standard PSA tests. However, using AccuPSA, researchers were able to measure PSA in all of the samples.

"AccuPSA is designed to help the physician and patients to become better informed by measuring PSA after radical prostatectomy and establishing if the cancer is gone or has metastasized or recurred," Dr. Wilson said.

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