PAs in urology: Vital statistics

November 6, 2014

Physician assistants are expected to play a larger role in urology practices amid a shortage of urologists. Here’s a statistical look at PAs in urology (and medicine in general), provided by Aaron Milbank, MD, and Ken Mitchell, MPAS, of Metro Urology during the Large Urology Group Practice Association annual meeting in Chicago.

Physician assistants (PAs) are expected to play a larger role in urology practices amid a shortage of urologists. Here’s a statistical look at PAs in urology (and medicine in general), provided by Aaron Milbank, MD, and Ken Mitchell, MPAS, of Metro Urology during the Large Urology Group Practice Association annual meeting in Chicago.

  • 793 urology PAs represent 1.5% of the total PA work force.

  • 61% of urology PAs are female.

  • Median age of a urology PA is 38 years.

  • In 2009, 46% of urology PAs worked in a single-specialty practice setting, 23% worked in an outpatient hospital unit, and 13% worked in an inpatient hospital unit.

  • In 2008, 74% of academic urology practices used PAs and advanced practice nurses versus 22% of solo practices (AUA ad hoc committee).

  • Fifty states, the District of Columbia, and most U.S. territories authorize PA prescribing privileges.

  • Between 2010 and 2022, the total number of PAs in clinical practice is expected to grow 39%: from 86,700 to 120,000.

  • 93% of U.S. adults say PAs are trusted health care providers (September 2014 Harris poll).

ALSO SEE: PAs address shortage, but their role can be controversial

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