Study: Cryotherapy offers long-term efficacy for localized PCa

April 10, 2008

Cryotherapy provides long-term disease control equivalent to that of more conventional therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, according to a study published in Urology (2008; 71:515-8).

Cryotherapy provides long-term disease control equivalent to that of more conventional therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, according to a study published in Urology (2008; 71:515-8).

“Acceptance of cryotherapy as a viable therapeutic alternative for prostate cancer has steadily grown over the past decade,” said Jeff Cohen, MD, of Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh. “It is still considered controversial by many as a primary treatment modality, however, because of concerns about the procedure’s long-term efficacy. Our study’s findings allay that concern, particularly among low-risk patients.”

Dr. Cohen, who co-authored the study with Ralph Miller, MD, and colleagues, performed a retrospective analysis of 370 patients treated at Allegheny General with cryotherapy for stage 1 to 3 cancer of the prostate. Only patients with no prior radiation, hormonal, or surgical therapy were included.

With a median follow-up of 12.5 years, the team documented biochemical disease-free survival rates of 80.56%, 74.16%, and 45.54% for groups of low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients, respectively, at 10 years. The 10-year negative biopsy rate was 76.96%.

“Most observers would consider 10-year follow-up data more than adequate in judging the effectiveness of a treatment for prostate cancer,” Dr. Miller said. “Patient outcomes in this study suggest that cryotherapy affords long-term rates of biochemical disease control that are within the ranges of men treated with the most commonly used minimally invasive modalities-external beam radiation or prostate brachytherapy.”