Video: Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

Dec 21, 2018

The development of an ultrasonic stone propulsion system marks a significant advance in the treatment of kidney stones. This video explains how the system, which is still in development, is used to facilitate stone passage.

The development of an ultrasonic stone propulsion system marks a significant advance in the treatment of kidney stones. This video explains how the system, which is still in development, is used to facilitate stone passage.

Commentary on the video is provided by 'Y'tube Section Editor James M. Hotaling, MD, MS, assistant professor of surgery (urology) at the Center for Reconstructive Urology and Men's Health, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

 

At the University of Washington, researchers have developed a noninvasive surgical stone management system that uses an office-based, handheld ultrasound device to target, detach, break, and expel stones and stone fragments from the urinary space to facilitate natural clearance. In this video, the authors explain how the ultrasound system is used to image, target, and reposition stones or fragments to facilitate passage or relieve an obstruction. The investigational device is approved for specific human trials by the FDA.

Disclosure: The technology described in this video is licensed from the University of Washington to SonoMotion, which is developing a commercial version.

Dr. Hotaling: Here Dr. Bailey and colleagues describe an ultrasonic stone propulsion system. This system, which has been in development for quite some time, represents a significant advancement for the millions of patients with stone disease and the urologists who care for them. The investigators have developed a way to use ultrasound to move a stone percutaneously within the kidney. This represents a novel noninvasive option for patients with stones. As the technology develops, there will likely be other applications for these tools to help patients with stones.

 

Mathew D. Sorensen, MD, MS

Patrick Samson, MD

 

Michael R. Bailey, PhD

Jonathan D. Harper, MD

Dr. Sorensen is assistant professor of urology; Dr. Samson is an endourology fellow; Dr. Bailey is a senior principal engineer at the Center for Medical and Industrial Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, and assistant professor of mechanical engineering and adjunct assistant professor of urology; and Dr. Harper is chief of endourology and minimally invasive surgery and associate professor of urology at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.

 

'Y'tube Section Editor James M. Hotaling, MD, MS, is assistant professor of surgery (urology) at the Center for Reconstructive Urology and Men's Health, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.