Dr. Abdallah discusses new research on IsoPSA for prostate cancer

Video

"We found that if the patient has normal IsoPSA, he has only 1% of risk of developing clinically significant prostate cancer in a median follow-up time of 18 months," says Nour Abdallah, MD.

In this video, Nour Abdallah, MD, discusses new findings on IsoPSA’s prospective predictive ability of clincially significant prostate cancer, which were presented at the 2023 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, California. Abdallah is a postdoctoral research fellow at Cleveland Clinic Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute in Cleveland, Ohio.

Video Transcript:

IsoPSA is a structure based serum assay that explores all the isoforms of PSA. It's done in men who are aged more than 50 years old and who have a high PSA value. IsoPSA has been studied in the literature and proven to be more effective than the total and the percent-free PSA in detecting clinically significant prostate cancer on biopsy. It was proven to reduce unnecessary biopsies and MRIs. What we did is the first follow-up longitudinal study of patients with normal and high IsoPSA, and then try to see how many patients will actually develop clinically significant prostate cancer. We found that if the patient has normal IsoPSA, he has only 1% of risk of developing clinically significant prostate cancer in a median follow-up time of 18 months. So, we can safely say that during that median follow-up time, patients can be safely avoiding biopsies and MRIs and extensive testing, which can be beneficial for the patient because he's not going to undergo testing stress and potential complications. Also the health care system will benefit from it because it's very costly, and the health care system is already overwhelmed with a lot of stuff right now.

This transcription was edited for clarity.

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