Kidney disease linked to prostate obstruction

July 8, 2005

Men who experience signs and symptoms of prostate obstruction resulting from BPH are three times more likely to develop chronic kidney disease, according to a community-based study from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Men who experience signs and symptoms of prostate obstruction resulting from BPH are three times more likely to develop chronic kidney disease, according to a community-based study from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

"We were surprised at how much kidney disease can be attributed to BPH," said co-author Steven Jacobsen, MD, PhD. "An obstruction on the urethra is like a dam on a river—men can still void, but the constant build-up and pressure will ultimately cause damage."

The study included 476 symptomatic and non-symptomatic Caucasian men, aged 40 to 79 years, randomly selected from Olmsted County, MN. After adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes, leukocyte esterase positive (possible urinary tract infection), and smoking, chronic kidney disease was associated with diminished peak urinary flow rate (<15 mL/s) by an odds ratio of 2.96, moderate-severe lower urinary tract symptoms (IPSS >7) by an OR of 2.91, and chronic urinary retention (post-void residual >100 mL) by an OR of 2.28, the authors reported.

The researchers said they would like to see if similar findings are reproduced among other general populations and if further research and testing will determine if treating BPH reverses the progression of kidney disease.

"This is the first study on the topic to sample the general community," said Andrew Rule, MD, also a co-author. "Symptomatic and non-symptomatic men were compared, unlike clinical trials and studies in a urology practice, which tend to represent only symptomatic men."