New Products: Cuff stops urinary leakages in PCa patients

December 13, 2018

Also learn about a new stone device, an at-home testosterone enanthate injection, and more.

Cuff stops urinary leakages in prostate cancer patients

The Pacey Cuff is a urethral control device that stops urinary leakages and reduces the dependency on absorption pads by up to 100% in men who have undergone prostate cancer treatment. According to manufacturer Pacey MedTech Ltd., the cuff is more comfortable than traditional penile clamps as it maintains consistent and effective blood flow to the penis. The Pacey Cuff is designed for compression of the urethra to minimize leakage and also to protect the blood circulation in the topside of the penis, eliminating possible blood supply restriction pain. The cuff was created to be light, soft, and comfortable to ensure patients can discretely wear it all day, continue to live a normal life, and engage in regular activities, the company says.

 

For more information, visit www.paceycuff.com.

Next: Stone device enables simultaneous ureteroscope, basket use

Stone device enables simultaneous ureteroscope, basket use

Boston Scientific has announced the global launch of the LithoVue Empower Retrieval Deployment Device, designed to be used with the LithoVue Single-Use Digital Flexible Ureteroscope and compatible nitinol retrieval basket to enable urologists to operate a ureteroscope and basket simultaneously when retrieving kidney stones via flexible ureteroscopy. Data presented by Kevin Koo, MD, showed the LithoVue Empower Device permitted a single surgeon to perform flexible ureteroscopy with stone manipulation and retrieval, using less muscular workload than a single-surgeon ureteroscopy (ie, where a single surgeon has to operate both the ureteroscope and retrieval tool) and similar workload to two-surgeon ureteroscopy. Task completion time was also improved with LithoVue Empower over the single-surgeon model and similar to the two-surgeon model, according to Boston Scientific.

For more information, visit www.bostonscientific.com.

Next: At-home testosterone enanthate injection earns FDA approval

At-home testosterone enanthate injection earns FDA approval

The FDA has approved testosterone enanthate (XYOSTED) injection. According to manufacturer Antares Pharma, Inc., the agent is the first FDA-approved subcutaneous testosterone enanthate product for once-weekly, at-home self-administration with an easy-to-use, single-dose, disposable QuickShot auto injector. Testosterone enanthate has been approved in three dosage strengths-50 mg, 75 mg, and 100 mg-and is indicated for testosterone replacement therapy in adult males for conditions associated with a deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone.

For more information, visit www.antarespharma.com.

Next: Artificial intelligence-enabled features improve patient flow

Artificial intelligence-enabled features improve patient flow

Compulink Healthcare Solutions has introduced new artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled features to its EHR and practice management systems. Called Advantage SMART Practice, it uses AI technology and real-time data from the clinic to completely automate tasks such as billing, along with eliminating steps to improve patient flow. AI-driven enhancements include Advantage SMART Workflow, which lets providers and staff know who is waiting, where they need to go next, and keeps them constantly informed; and Advantage SMART Patient Engagement, which automatically communicates personalized content directly to the patient’s mobile device.

For more information, visit www.compulinkadvantage.com.

Next: Patient-focused book for men outlines urologic conditions, treatments

Patient-focused book for men outlines urologic conditions, treatments

In “How’s It Hanging? Expert Answers to the Questions Men Don’t Always Ask,” urologists Neil Baum, MD, and Scott Miller, MD, use humor, analogies, illustrations, and case examples to share their knowledge of the penis, prostate, and testicles. The book discusses the male anatomy, as well as conditions such as erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, cancer, testosterone deficiency, and sexually transmitted diseases, and how they can be treated. The book’s aim is to help men make informed decisions about their medical care, according to Skyhorse Publishing.

For more information, visit www.skyhorsepublishing.com.

 

FDA approves radiotherapeutic treatment for adrenal tumors

The FDA has approved the New Drug Application for iobenguane I 131 (AZEDRA), 555 MBq/mL injection for intravenous use. Iobenguane I 131, a radiotherapeutic, is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years and older with iobenguane scan positive, unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma who require systemic anticancer therapy. Iobenguane I 131 A is the first and only approved therapy for this indication, says manufacturer Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

 

For more information, visit www.progenics.com.

 

Web platform facilitates provider engagement in advocacy

Revenue cycle management services provider Zotec Partners has launched an advocacy platform that allows users to take action on state and federal legislation that directly impacts their health care business. The website gives users intuitive and easy ways to engage in public policy, in the simple click of a button, with options to send pre-written updates and grassroots alerts directly to state and federal legislators, post social media messages directly to their appointed representatives, or reach out to them via phone or email with a call to action.

 

For more information, visit www.zotecpac.com.