Oral bisphosphonate may prevent bone loss related to ADT

April 4, 2007

Weekly oral treatment with the bisphosphonate alendronate (Fosamax) may prevent bone loss and bone turnover resulting from androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate cancer, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center report.

Weekly oral treatment with the bisphosphonate alendronate (Fosamax) may prevent bone loss and bone turnover resulting from androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate cancer, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center report.

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, partial crossover trial, researchers examined 112 men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer who were being treated with ADT. Patients received either alendronate, 70 mg once weekly, or placebo, as well as calcium and vitamin D supplements.

Results of the study, published in Annals of Internal Medicine (2007; 146:416-24), showed that at baseline, 39% of men had osteoporosis and 52% had low bone mass. In the alendronate group, bone mineral density increased over 1 year by 3.7% (p<.001) at the spine and 1.6% (p=.008) at the femoral neck. At 12 months, the two groups differed by 5.1 percentage points (p<.001) at the spine and by 2.3 percentage points (p<.001) at the femoral neck. Bone turnover was also significantly reduced as a result of alendronate treatment, according to the researchers, led by Susan L. Greenspan, MD.

Adverse events did not differ between the two groups.