PDE-5 inhibitor improves ED in men with dyslipidemia

December 20, 2007

Vardenafil (Levitra) significantly improves the ability of men with erectile dysfunction and dyslipidemia to achieve and maintain an erection for successful sexual intercourse, according to a study presented at the Sexual Medicine Society of North America winter scientific meeting in Chicago.

Vardenafil (Levitra) significantly improves the ability of men with erectile dysfunction and dyslipidemia to achieve and maintain an erection for successful sexual intercourse, according to a study presented at the Sexual Medicine Society of North America winter scientific meeting in Chicago.

“ED is associated with high cholesterol, yet many physicians are not treating ED, a life-changing condition,” said study author Martin Miner, MD, of Brown University, Providence, RI. “This study provides further support that vardenafil can successfully treat ED, even in men with a serious common condition like high cholesterol.”

In the double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 395 men, age 18 to 64 years, who had ED and dyslipidemia were randomized to treatment with vardenafil or placebo for 12 weeks. Men treated with vardenafil had statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements in SEP2 scores (a rating system that measures maintenance of an erection) and SEP3 scores versus placebo (79.1% and 66.7%, respectively, for vardenafil, vs. 51.9% and 33.8%, respectively, for placebo). International Index of Erectile Function scores also were significantly higher for the vardenafil group compared with the placebo group.

The drug was well tolerated, with treatment-related headache and upper respiratory tract infections occurring in 5% of patients.

Look for additional coverage of the SMSNA meeting in an upcoming issue of Urology Times.