Urologists use single keyhole surgery to remove kidney

September 6, 2007

Surgeons at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, effectively removed a patient's kidney by conducting an atypical nephrectomy, known as “single keyhole access” surgery, via the umbilicus. This marked the first such surgery that involved a kidney, and it required one incision.

Surgeons at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, effectively removed a patient's kidney by conducting an atypical nephrectomy, known as “single keyhole access” surgery, via the umbilicus. This marked the first such surgery that involved a kidney, and it required one incision.

"We are proud of this novel surgical technique," said Jeffrey Cadeddu, MD, who performed the surgery. "This transumbilical technique is a further extension of laparoscopic surgery, which essentially removes scarring from the patient's skin."

The surgery was handled by using high-dexterity instruments known as RealHand (Novare Surgical Systems, Cupertino, CA), which allow surgeons to conduct more complex maneuvers regardless of where the instrument is placed in relation to the organ. With the help of the instruments, Dr. Cadeddu could successfully place all laparoscopic entry points at the umbilicus.